Data from: Biotically driven vegetation mosaics in grazing ecosystems: the battle between bioturbation and biocompaction

Howison RA, Olff H, van de Koppel J, Smit C

Date Published: March 14, 2017

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3f2j7

 

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Title Howison et al 2017 Bioturbation Biocompaction
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Description TITLE: Biotically driven vegetation mosaics in grazing ecosystems: the battle between bioturbation and biocompaction AUTHORS: Ruth A. Howison, Han Olff, Johan van de Koppel, and Christian Smit Corresponding author: Ruth A. Howison (ruthhowison@gmail.com) BifurcationModel.zip Bifurcation model resulting in figures 2 and 3, designed and written by Johan van de Koppel and Ruth Howison, using R. R Core Team (2015). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. URL https://www.R-project.org/. Phase planes depicting the bifurcation analysis of simple plant-herbivore models, showing the more classical A) Herbivore-plant quality feedback, and B) Water-infiltration feedback. Phase planes depicting the bifurcation analysis of plant-herbivore models with bioturbation, showing that the interplay between bioturbation and biocompaction strongly expands the conditions under which heterogeneity can persist in grazing ecosystems, with A) only bioturbation feedback and B) the consequence of combining bioturbation and biocompaction feedbacks." GIS_Rainfall_Texture_Analysis.zip Analysis by Ruth Howison and Han Olff, using ESRI ArcMap 10.3 for Desktop Global prediction of the regions where patchiness generated by bioturbation and biocompaction is possible, eliminating for unsuitable conditions, specifically certain soil characteristics and rainfall. Incompatible soils include; permafrost, sand (> 70% sand fraction and < 15% clay fraction), organic soil (histosols or > 20% organic material dry mass), and rainfall < 400 and > 1200 mm/yr and representing limits to forage quantity and quality required to maintain large herbivores. Data sources used: harmonized world soil database (HWSD) version 1.21, 2) Rainfall parameters were delineated using the global precipitation surface available from BioClim.org (Hijmans et al. 2005)
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When using this data, please cite the original publication:

Howison RA, Olff H, van de Koppel J, Smit C (2017) Biotically driven vegetation mosaics in grazing ecosystems: the battle between bioturbation and biocompaction. Ecological Monographs 87(3): 363-378. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecm.1259

Additionally, please cite the Dryad data package:

Howison RA, Olff H, van de Koppel J, Smit C (2017) Data from: Biotically driven vegetation mosaics in grazing ecosystems: the battle between bioturbation and biocompaction. Dryad Digital Repository. http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3f2j7
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