Data from: Spontaneous metacognition in rhesus monkeys

Rosati AG, Santos LR

Date Published: July 12, 2016

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5t0b8

 

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Title Rosati_&_Santos-Metacognition
Downloaded 35 times
Description Data file for monkey searched in Rosati & Santos (2016) "Spontaneous metacognition in rhesus monkeys." Key for codes included as a separate tab in the file.
Download Rosati_&_Santos-Metacognition.xlsx (56.59 Kb)
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Title Video_S1-Twotubes-Visible
Downloaded 32 times
Description Video S1: Two tubes condition—Visible baiting. In the experimental demonstration, E1 lifts up the two tubes, taps them against each other to show they are empty, and then places them in the v-shaped configuration on the ground in front of the occluder. She then picks up a fake fruit with her right hand and appears to place this fruit on the right distal side opening of one of the tubes (baiting hand and side was counterbalanced across monkeys). She then picks up the occluder and walks away so that the monkey can approach; in the real study she moved behind the camera person (E2). In the example response clip, the monkey approaches and looks in the right side. Note that orientation of video switches: in the demonstration it shows the monkey’s perspective, whereas in the example test clip E2 is behind E1 while she does the demonstration.
Download Video_S1-Twotubes-Visible.mp4 (19.67 Mb)
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Title Video_S2-Twotubes-Hidden
Downloaded 12 times
Description Video S2: Two tubes condition—Hidden baiting. In the experimental demonstration, E1 lifts up the two tubes, taps them against each other to show they are empty, and then places them in the v-shaped configuration on the ground in front of the occluder. Before baiting the tubes, she moves the occluder in front of the tubes (from the monkey’s perspective). She then picks up a fake fruit with her left hand (hand counterbalanced across monkeys) and moved it down; the monkey’s view of the baiting event is then blocked by the occluder. She then picks up the occluder and walks away so that the monkey can approach; in the real study she moved behind the camera person (E2). In the example response clip, the monkey approaches and looks in the center opening of the tubes; in this example, the monkey visibly checks both tubes from this center position. Note that orientation of video switches: in the demonstration it shows the monkey’s perspective, whereas in the example test clip E2 is behind E1 while she does the demonstration.
Download Video_S2-Twotubes-Hidden.mp4 (21.96 Mb)
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Title Video_S3-Onetube-Visible
Downloaded 12 times
Description Video S3: One tube condition—Visible baiting. In the experimental demonstration, E1 lifts up the single tube and tapes it with her hand to show it is empty, and then places it on the ground with the openings perpendicular to the monkey’s perspective She then picks up a fake fruit with her left hand and appears to place this fruit on the side opening (baiting hand and side was counterbalanced across monkeys). She then picks up the occluder and walks away so that the monkey can approach; in the real study she moved behind the camera person (E2). In the example response clip, the monkey approaches and looks in the left side. Note that orientation of video switches: in the demonstration it shows the monkey’s perspective, whereas in the example test clip E2 is behind E1 while she does the demonstration.
Download Video_S3-Onetube-Visible.mp4 (18.18 Mb)
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Title Video_S4-Onetube-Hidden
Downloaded 10 times
Description Video S4: One tube condition—Hidden baiting. In the experimental demonstration, E1 lifts up the single tube and tapes it with her hand to show it is empty, and then places it on the ground with the openings perpendicular to the monkey’s perspective. She then picks up a fake fruit with her right hand (hand counterbalanced across monkeys) and moved it down; the monkey’s view of the baiting event is then blocked by the occluder. She then picks up the occluder and walks away so that the monkey can approach; in the real study she moved behind the camera person (E2). In the example response clip, the monkey approaches the center location and looks under the tube. Note that orientation of video switches: in the demonstration it shows the monkey’s perspective, whereas in the example test clip E2 is behind E1 while she does the demonstration.
Download Video_S4-Onetube-Hidden.mp4 (24.21 Mb)
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Title Video_S5-Exclusion-Interference
Downloaded 20 times
Description Video S5: Example Exclusion—Interference. The target monkey is appropriately centered during the experimenter’s demonstration. E1 leaves so the subject can approach, but a larger male approached from the left side of the screen and displaces the target subject to the side before they can make a choice.
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Title Video_S6-Exclusion-Left
Downloaded 10 times
Description Video S6: Example Exclusion—Left. The target monkey watches the experimenter’s demonstration. E1 leaves so the subject can approach, but the subject runs away before approaching to make a choice.
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Title Video_S7-Exclusion-NoApproach
Downloaded 8 times
Description Video S7: Example Exclusion—No Approach. The target monkey watches the experimenter’s demonstration. E1 leaves so the subject can approach, but the subject does not approach for more than 1 minute (timed with a stopwatch). Near the end of this time, the subject begins to groom another monkey who sat near them.
Download Video_S7-Exclusion-NoApproach.mp4 (41.68 Mb)
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When using this data, please cite the original publication:

Rosati AG, Santos LR (2016) Spontaneous metacognition in rhesus monkeys. Psychological Science 27(9): 1181-1191. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797616653737

Additionally, please cite the Dryad data package:

Rosati AG, Santos LR (2016) Data from: Spontaneous metacognition in rhesus monkeys. Dryad Digital Repository. http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.5t0b8
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