Data from: Unexpected positive and negative effects of continuing inbreeding in one of the world’s most inbred wild animals

Weiser EL, Grueber CE, Kennedy ES, Jamieson IG

Date Published: December 10, 2015

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.81tg6

 

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Title Black robin individual data
Description Individual data (parentage, sex, hatch date, population, inbreeding coefficient, etc.) of Chatham Island black robins, as used in analyses by Weiser et al. (Evolution). Data were collected in wild populations in 1990-2001. One line per individual. Individual ID is the number from the first metal band applied to the individual. "Rim_layer" column indicates whether the individual ever laid eggs on the rim of the nest; relevant for females only.
Download Weiser et al_DatasetS1.csv (86.01 Kb)
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Title Black robin breeding data
Description Breeding data (breeding pair IDs, kinship, location of nest in UTMs, distance to nearest neighbor's nest, number of offspring) for Chatham Island black robins, as used in analyses by Weiser et al. (Evolution). Data were collected in three wild subpopulations (Mangere Island, and Woolshed Bush and Top Bush on Rangatira Island) in 1990-2001. The file shows one line per clutch; some breeding pairs had multiple clutches in some years. Female and male IDs are the numbers from the first metal bands applied to each parent, and can be cross-referenced with the "individual data" file from this publication. "Independent young" are those that reach nutritional independence from parents, after fledging from the nest and being fed on the parents' territory for a month or two.
Download Weiser et al_DatasetS2.csv (54.91 Kb)
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When using this data, please cite the original publication:

Weiser EL, Grueber CE, Kennedy ES, Jamieson IG (2015) Unexpected positive and negative effects of continuing inbreeding in one of the world’s most inbred wild animals. Evolution 70(1): 154–166. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12840

Additionally, please cite the Dryad data package:

Weiser EL, Grueber CE, Kennedy ES, Jamieson IG (2015) Data from: Unexpected positive and negative effects of continuing inbreeding in one of the world’s most inbred wild animals. Dryad Digital Repository. http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.81tg6
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