Data from: Spatial soil heterogeneity has a greater effect on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and plant growth than genetic modification with Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes

Cheeke TE, Schütte UM, Hemmerich CM, Cruzan MB, Rosenstiel TN, Bever JD

Date Published: March 31, 2015

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b80f6

 

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Title Table S1 Soil data
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Description Percent organic matter (OM), pH, and soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) data collected from field plots (Corvallis, OR, USA). One composite sample was collected per plot and air-dried soils were analyzed for nutrients and soil properties at Indiana University.
Download Table S1 Soil data.xlsx (44.01 Kb)
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Title Table S2 MaarjAM OTU IDs
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Description Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Family, Genus, Species) in roots of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and non-Bt maize cultivated in a field experiment (Corvallis, Oregon, USA). Closest matching (97% nucleotide sequence identity) accession numbers were obtained via BLAST searches in the MaarjAM reference sequence database(http://maarjam.botany.ut.ee/). The accession numbers are linked to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI).
Download Table S2 MaarjAM OTU IDs.xlsx (79.18 Kb)
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Title Table S3 Growth AMF data_all plots
Downloaded 8 times
Description Data file of growth response and percent root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize plants and their non-Bt parental isolines harvested from a field experiment 60 days after sowing (Corvallis, OR, USA). Data were collected from a total of 360 plants in 20 replicate field plots. The Legend, which provides information pertaining to each column heading, is located on the second sheet of the Excel file.
Download Table S3 Growth AMF data_all plots.xlsx (79.84 Kb)
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Title Table S4 Growth AMF and OTU data_molecular plots
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Description Data file of growth responses, percent root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and operational taxonomic units (OTU) obtained by 454 pyrosequencing for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize and non-Bt parental isolines harvested from a subset of five plots in a field experiment 60 days after sowing (Corvallis, OR, USA). The X,Y coordinates (cm) for each plant were used in the analysis of spatial variability of AMF communities (Mantel Correlogram; Fig. 4). The Legend, which provides information pertaining to each column heading, is located on the second sheet of the Excel file.
Download Table S4 Growth AMF and OTU data_molecula...ts.xls (160.7 Kb)
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Title Figure S1 Plot Layout
Downloaded 23 times
Description Plot layout of a field experiment conducted from June through August 2011 (Corvallis, OR, USA) to test the effects of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and non-Bt maize on the colonization ability and community diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in roots. Each plot measured 1 m by 1.2 m in size and there was a 1 m unplanted border around all plots. Each plot contained 20 plants (14 different cultivars B1-B9 and P1-P5) and each Bt cultivar was sown next to its non-Bt parental (P) isoline. Corresponding Bt/P pairs are indicated in the plot map as follows: B1/P1 = pink; B2/P2 = yellow; B3/P3 = purple; B4/P4 = gray; B5/P3 = brown; B6/P2 = green; B7/P5 = red; B8/P5 = blue; and B9/P5 = orange. Plant IDs followed by a "T" (in white) were used to trap spores for later experiments and are thus not included in the present study. Plant growth responses and percent AMF colonization in roots were recorded for all plants in the experiment (360 plants). Root samples collected from a subset of plots (2, 8, 10, 14, and 16; outlined in black) were used for molecular analysis of AMF communities using 454 pyrosequencing (90 plants).
Download Figure S1 Plot Layout.pdf (44.68 Kb)
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Title Figure S2 Alpha Rarefaction Plots
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Description Rarefaction analysis of AMF communities in Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and non-Bt maize roots from a field experiment (Corvallis, OR, USA). Plots were generated by Qiime and use the Chao1 metric to measure alpha diversity in each sample at multiple levels of rarefaction.
Download Alpha Rarefaction Plots.zip (11.66 Mb)
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Title OTU Consensus Sequences
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Description FASTA file containing the consensus DNA sequences for the 143 operational taxonomic units (OTU) generated by AbundantOTU with a 97% sequence identity cutoff. Taxonomic information for each sequence is available in Table S2 and the read count for each OTU per sample is available in Table S4.
Download OTU Consensus Sequences.txt (51.65 Kb)
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When using this data, please cite the original publication:

Cheeke TE, Schütte UM, Hemmerich CM, Cruzan MB, Rosenstiel TN, Bever JD (2015) Spatial soil heterogeneity has a greater effect on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and plant growth than genetic modification with Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes. Molecular Ecology 24(10): 2580-2593. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.13178

Additionally, please cite the Dryad data package:

Cheeke TE, Schütte UM, Hemmerich CM, Cruzan MB, Rosenstiel TN, Bever JD (2015) Data from: Spatial soil heterogeneity has a greater effect on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities and plant growth than genetic modification with Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes. Dryad Digital Repository. http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b80f6
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