Data from: In a long-term experimental demography study, excluding ungulates reversed invader’s explosive population growth rate and restored natives

Kalisz S, Spigler RB, Horvitz CC

Date Published: May 2, 2014

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bk272

 

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Title Annual matrices for Alliaria petiolata and Trillium erectum and spatial weighting
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Description Data for the demographic matrices were collected on individually tagged plants growing in paired plots located in Trillium Trail. Paired plot locations were chosen in Spring 2002 spanning the range of habitats in this forest where our focal species were found to co-occur. In Fall 2002, we established paired plots (n = 6 pairs of 14 x 14-m plots). One plot per pair was randomly assigned to a fenced treatment that excluded deer, eliminating only deer while allowing all other animals free access. Fenced plots were enclosed with 3-m-high, 15 x 15-cm steel mesh. Fences were maintained continuously, creating two treatments: deer access and deer exclusion. Each plot contained 36, 4-m-square subplots, with footpaths every 4 m to ensure minimal disturbance by data collectors. For Alliaria, which was abundant in all plots, we created separate annual matrices for each plot, six matrices for fenced plots (not accessible to deer) and six matrices for unfenced plots (accessible to deer), for each of the four transition years. Within the range of areas where our focal species were present in Trillium Trail, we chose plots to span the gradient in topography from level to sloped, locating matched pairs along this gradient. We then determined the proportion of the total area of Trillium Trail that was similar to each matched pair. Thus, we were able to apply a weighted average to the data that was representative of the habitats where our focal species were found at the study site. Each plot pair (1–6) was weighted 10%, 10%, 20%, 20%, 20%, and 20%, respectively. To scale up to the level of the entire study site, we created a spatial average by weighting our single plot results accordingly. This resulted in a site-wide spatial average for each transition year and treatment, where the weighting for Alliaria was by abundance of the habitat at the site. For Trillium, which varied in abundance among the pairs of plots (and was absent from the habitat represented by one of the pairs), we created a single matrix for each treatment and transition year, pooling data across all plots of a given treatment (fenced vs. unfenced, abbreviated NO_DEER and DEER) for each of the transition years (2003–2004, 2004–2005, 2005–2006, 2006–2007, abbreviated 2003, 2004, 2005, and 2006). This resulted in a site-wide spatial average, where the weighting for Trillium was by abundance of individuals in each plot.
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When using this data, please cite the original publication:

Kalisz S, Spigler RB, Horvitz CC (2014) In a long-term experimental demography study, excluding ungulates reversed invader’s explosive population growth rate and restored natives. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111(12): 4501–4506. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1310121111

Additionally, please cite the Dryad data package:

Kalisz S, Spigler RB, Horvitz CC (2014) Data from: In a long-term experimental demography study, excluding ungulates reversed invader’s explosive population growth rate and restored natives. Dryad Digital Repository. http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.bk272
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