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dc.contributor.author Marx, Hannah E.
dc.contributor.author Giblin, David E.
dc.contributor.author Dunwiddie, Peter W.
dc.contributor.author Tank, David C.
dc.coverage.spatial San Juan Islands
dc.coverage.spatial Washington
dc.coverage.spatial United States of America
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-04T21:03:11Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-04T21:03:11Z
dc.date.issued 2015-11-18
dc.identifier doi:10.5061/dryad.m88g7
dc.identifier.citation Marx HE, Giblin DE, Dunwiddie PW, Tank DC (2016) Deconstructing Darwin’s naturalization conundrum in the San Juan Islands using community phylogenetics and functional traits. Diversity and Distributions 22(3): 318–331.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10255/dryad.100012
dc.description Aim: Darwin posed a conundrum about species invasions, postulating the importance of functional distinctiveness from the receiving native community to avoid competition, and, at the same time, the importance of shared similarity to pass environmental filters and successfully establish. Using phylogenetic distances and functional traits, we assessed this conundrum in the flora of 80 mostly uninhabited islands, where over 30% of the species are invasive. We highlight the importance of publicly available datasets to disentangle ecological processes that may drive invasion. Location: San Juan Islands archipelago, Pacific Northwest of North America. Methods: Using a supermatrix approach, we inferred a maximum-likelihood estimate of the mega-phylogeny for the vascular plants on the San Juan Islands. We gathered measurements for five ecologically relevant functional traits – seed mass, maximum height, specific leaf area, leaf size and leaf nitrogen content. We assessed phylogenetic and functional trait similarity between invasive species and the receiving native community, and tested the significance of the observed patterns against a randomly generated invading community. Results: Invasive species were more closely related (phylogenetically clustered) to their nearest native than natives were on 40 of the islands and were more clustered than any random invasive in the species pool on 22 islands. Despite phylogenetic similarity, functional traits differed between the two status groups, at least for maximum height and specific leaf area. When comparing functional differences between phylogenetically close relatives, more complex patterns emerge. Main conclusion: Only with the combination of both evolutionary history and phenotypic traits were we able to discover support for both sides of Darwin's conundrum – although invasive species have phylogenetically close native relatives, functional traits differ between the two status groups. This implies that both environmental filtering and competitive interactions may be important for invasion success in this archipelago.
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.m88g7/1
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.m88g7/2
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.m88g7/3
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.m88g7/4
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.m88g7/5
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.m88g7/6
dc.relation.isreferencedby doi:10.1111/ddi.12401
dc.subject Biological invasions
dc.subject community phylogenetics
dc.subject Darwin’s Naturalization Conundrum
dc.subject functional traits
dc.subject islands
dc.subject mega-phylogeny
dc.title Data from: Deconstructing Darwin’s naturalization conundrum in the San Juan Islands using community phylogenetics and functional traits
dc.type Article
prism.publicationName Diversity and Distributions

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Title Island Community Matrix
Downloaded 37 times
Description Datamatrix of species occurrences (presence / absence) across all 80 sampled islands in the San Juan archipelago, Washington State, USA
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Title Functional Traits
Downloaded 42 times
Description Measurements of five ecologically relevant functional traits (seed mass, maximum height, specific leaf area, leaf size, and nitrogen content) for each species occurring on the islands sampled
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Title Island Metadata
Downloaded 29 times
Description Metadata and summaries of species richness for all 80 islands sampled in the San Juan Island archipelago, Washington, USA
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Title San Juan Islands Community Phylogeny
Downloaded 29 times
Description Time-calibrated maximum likelihood mega-phylogeny of the vascular flora of the San Juan Islands
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Title Alignments
Downloaded 25 times
Description Sequence alignments for each gene region with GenBank accession numbers for each species and the concatenated sequence alignment
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Title Treefiles
Downloaded 23 times
Description Maximum likelihood phylograms for each gene region and the concatenated alignment
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