Data from: Specialists and generalists coexist within a population of spider-hunting mud dauber wasps

Powell EC, Taylor LA

Date Published: March 9, 2017

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.nv1fd

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Title Foraging data for individual wasps
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Description Each individual female wasp is indicated by a unique “Wasp ID”. Because each nest is made up of multiple cells, each prey item is labeled with a “Cell number”. These cell numbers do not indicate anything about the age of the nest cell or the order of nest provisioning (see Methods in Powell and Taylor 2017). The Excel file includes three sheets. The first sheet includes data from one randomly-selected nest cell from each wasp in the study (with each cell containing between 5 and 22 prey items). The second sheet includes data for a second analysis conducted on the individual wasps that had at least three intact cells in their nest. If a wasp nest contained more than three cells, only three cells were selected (at random) for inclusion. Because only three nest cells were analyzed from each wasp in our study, data from additional cells (unanalyzed cells) are listed in the third sheet, “Unanalyzed cells”. Missing data (i.e., blank spaces in the data sheet) indicate that spider prey were unable to be measured or identified to the genus level. This occurred for one of two reasons. Most commonly, this was because the specimen was partially eaten by the feeding wasp larva. Alternatively, some juvenile specimens were unable to be identified to the genus level because they lacked the mature genitalia needed for accurate identification. All specimens from this study are deposited in the Florida State Collection of Arthropods (Gainesville, FL.) Please contact Erin Powell (epow209@aucklanduni.ac.nz), for more information regarding specific analyses discussed in the corresponding manuscript.
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When using this data, please cite the original publication:

Powell EC, Taylor LA (2017) Specialists and generalists coexist within a population of spider-hunting mud dauber wasps. Behavioral Ecology 28(3): 890–898. https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx050

Additionally, please cite the Dryad data package:

Powell EC, Taylor LA (2017) Data from: Specialists and generalists coexist within a population of spider-hunting mud dauber wasps. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.nv1fd
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