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Data from: Reward context determines risky choice in pigeons and humans

Citation

Ludvig, Elliot A. et al. (2014), Data from: Reward context determines risky choice in pigeons and humans, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3v0q8

Abstract

Whereas humans are risk averse for monetary gains, other animals can be risk seeking for food rewards, especially when faced with variable delays or under significant deprivation. A key difference between these findings is that humans are often explicitly told about the risky options, whereas non-human animals must learn about them from their own experience. We tested pigeons (Columba livia) and humans in formally identical choice tasks where all outcomes were learned from experience. Both species were more risk seeking for larger rewards than for smaller ones. The data suggest that the largest and smallest rewards experienced are overweighted in risky choice. This observed bias towards extreme outcomes represents a key step towards a consilience of these two disparate literatures, identifying common features that drive risky choice across phyla.

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Location

Edmonton Alberta Canada