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Data from: Urban landscape genetics: canopy cover predicts gene flow between white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) populations in New York City

Citation

Munshi-South, Jason (2011), Data from: Urban landscape genetics: canopy cover predicts gene flow between white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) populations in New York City, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7gh65757

Abstract

In this study, I examine the influence of urban canopy cover on gene flow between 15 white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) populations in New York City. Nm calculated from F_ST and recent migration estimated in BayesAss+, but not historic migration estimated in Migrate-n, exhibited significant isolation-by-distance (IBD). Gene flow was also associated with “effective distances” between populations that were calculated based on percent canopy cover using two different approaches: 1) isolation-by-effective-distance (IED) that calculates the single best pathway to minimize passage through high-resistance (i.e. low canopy cover) areas, and 2) isolation-by-resistance (IBR), an implementation of circuit theory that identifies all low-resistance paths through the landscape. IBR, but not IED, models were still significantly associated with all three measures of gene flow after factoring out the influence of IBD using partial Mantel tests. In cases where both IBR and IED explained gene flow independently of IBD, an additional partial Mantel test indicated that the IBR models still explained gene flow after factoring out IED. The IBR models that explained the most variation in recent migration after factoring out IBD (r = 0.70 – 0.90) included landscape cells with at least 60-80% canopy cover as low resistance habitat. These results have implications for understanding the impacts of urbanization trends on native wildlife, as well as for urban reforestation efforts that aim to improve urban ecosystem processes.

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References

Location

New York City