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Data and analysis scripts for: Asymmetrical reproductive barriers in sympatric Jewelflowers: are floral isolation, genetic incompatibilities, and floral trait displacement connected?

Citation

Christie, Kyle (2021), Data and analysis scripts for: Asymmetrical reproductive barriers in sympatric Jewelflowers: are floral isolation, genetic incompatibilities, and floral trait displacement connected?, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.25338/B8HD08

Abstract

Floral visitors influence reproductive interactions among sympatric plant species, either by facilitating assortative mating and contributing to reproductive isolation, or by promoting heterospecific pollen transfer, potentially leading to reproductive interference or hybridization.  We assessed preference and constancy of floral visitors on two co-occurring Jewelflowers (Streptanthus breweri and S. hesperidis, Brassicaceae) using field arrays, and quantified two floral rewards potentially important to foraging choice – pollen production and nectar sugar concentration – in a greenhouse common garden.  Floral visitors made an abundance of conspecific transitions between S. breweri individuals, which thus experienced minimal opportunities for heterospecific pollen transfer from S. hesperidis.  In contrast, behavioral isolation for S. hesperidis was essentially absent due to pollinator inconstancy.  This pattern emerged across multiple biotic environments and was unrelated to local density dependence.  S. breweri populations that are sympatric with S. hesperidis had higher nectar sugar concentrations than their sympatric congeners, as well as allopatric conspecifics.  Previous work shows that S. breweri suffers a greater cost to hybridization than S. hesperidis, and here we find that it also shows asymmetrical floral isolation and floral trait displacement in sympatry.  These findings suggest that trait divergence may reduce negative reproductive interactions between sympatric but genetically incompatible relatives.

Methods

Dataset includes 1) behavioral data of floral visitors from a field array experiment; 2) nectar sugar concentration and pollen production data from a greenhouse common garden.

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: 1120387

National Science Foundation, Award: 1601186

University of California, Davis, Award: Natural Reserve System Grant

Mildred E. Mathias Graduate Student Research Grant