Skip to main content
Dryad logo

The core seed mycobiome of P. menziesii var. menziesii across provenances of the Pacific Northwest, USA

Citation

Bergmann, Gillian; Busby, Posy (2021), The core seed mycobiome of P. menziesii var. menziesii across provenances of the Pacific Northwest, USA, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.25338/B8HS6B

Abstract

Fungal symbionts occur in all plant tissues, and many aid their host plants with critical functions, including nutrient acquisition, defense against pathogens, and tolerance of abiotic stress. “Core” taxa in the plant mycobiome, defined as fungi present across individuals, populations, or time, may be particularly crucial to plant survival during the challenging seedling stage. However, studies on core seed fungi are limited to individual sampling sites, raising the question of whether core taxa exist across large geographic scales. We addressed this question using both culture-based and culture-free techniques to identify the fungi found in individual seeds collected from nine provenances across the range of Coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii), a foundation tree species in the Pacific Northwest and a globally important timber crop that is propagated commercially by seed. Two key findings emerged: 1) Seed mycobiome composition differed among seed provenances. 2) Despite spatial variation in the seed mycobiome, we detected four core members, none of which is a known pathogen of Douglas-fir: Trichoderma spp., Hormonema macrosporum, Mucor plumbeus and Talaromyces rugulosus. Our results support the concept of a core seed microbiome, yet additional work is needed to determine the functional consequences of core taxa for seedling germination, growth, survival and competition. 

Funding

Mycological Society of America

Cascade Mycological Society