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Data from: Indirect genetic and environmental effects on behaviours, morphology, and life-history traits in a wild Eastern chipmunk population

Citation

Santostefano, Francesca (2021), Data from: Indirect genetic and environmental effects on behaviours, morphology, and life-history traits in a wild Eastern chipmunk population, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.000000039

Abstract

Additive genetic variance in a trait reflects its potential to respond to selection, which is key for adaptive evolution in the wild. Social interactions contribute to this genetic variation through indirect genetic effects —the effect of an individual’s genotype on the expression of a trait in a conspecific. However, our understanding of the evolutionary importance of indirect genetic effects in the wild and of their strength relative to direct genetic effects is limited. In this study, we assessed how indirect genetic effects contribute to genetic variation of behavioural, morphological, and life history traits in a wild Eastern chipmunk population. We also compared the contribution of direct and indirect genetic effects to traits evolvabilities and related these effects to selection strength across traits. We implemented a novel approach integrating the spatial structure of social interactions in quantitative genetic analyses, and supported the reliability of our results with power analyses. We found indirect genetic effects for trappability and relative fecundity, little direct genetic effects in all traits and a large role for direct and indirect permanent environmental effects. Our study highlights the potential evolutionary role of social permanent environmental effects in shaping phenotypes of conspecifics through adaptive phenotypic plasticity.

Methods

See methods section in the paper

Usage Notes

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