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Data from: Using partial genotyping to estimate the genetic and maternal determinants of adaptive traits in a progeny trial of Fagus sylvatica

Citation

Gauzere, J. et al. (2017), Data from: Using partial genotyping to estimate the genetic and maternal determinants of adaptive traits in a progeny trial of Fagus sylvatica, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.01n2q

Abstract

Understanding the determinants of phenotypic variation is critical to evaluate the ability of traits to evolve in a changing environment. In trees, the genetic component of the phenotypic variance is most often estimated based on maternal progeny tests. However, the lack of knowledge about the paternal relatedness hampers the accurate estimation of additive genetic and maternal effects. Here, we investigate how different methods accounting for paternal relatedness allow the estimation of heritability and maternal determinants of adaptive traits in a natural population of Fagus sylvatica L., presenting non-random mating. Twelve potentially adaptive functional traits were measured in 60 maternal families in a nursery. We genotyped a subset of offspring and of all the potentially reproductive adults in the population at 13 microsatellite markers to infer paternal relationships and to estimate average relatedness within and between maternal families. This relatedness information was then used in family and animal models to estimate the components of phenotypic variance. All the studied traits displayed significant genetic variance and moderate heritability. Maternal effects were detected for the diameter increment, stem volume and bud burst. Comparison of family and animal models showed that unbalanced mating system led to only slight departures from maternal family assumptions in the progeny trial. However, neglecting the significant maternal effects led to an overestimation of the heritability. Overall, we highlighted the usefulness of relatedness pattern analyses using polymorphic molecular markers to accurately analyse tree sibling designs.

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