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Data from: Canine sense of quantity: evidence for numerical ratio-dependent activation in parietotemporal cortex

Citation

Aulet, Lauren S et al. (2019), Data from: Canine sense of quantity: evidence for numerical ratio-dependent activation in parietotemporal cortex, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.02ts21t

Abstract

The approximate number system (ANS), which supports the rapid estimation of quantity, emerges early in human development and is widespread across species. Neural evidence from both human and non-human primates suggests the parietal cortex as a primary locus of numerical estimation, but it is unclear whether the numerical competencies observed across non-primate species are subserved by similar neural mechanisms. Moreover, because studies with non-human animals typically involve extensive training, little is known about the spontaneous numerical capacities of non-human animals. To address these questions, we examined the neural underpinnings of number perception using awake canine functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dogs passively viewed dot arrays that varied in ratio and, critically, received no task-relevant training or exposure prior to testing. We found evidence of ratio-dependent activation, which is a key feature of the ANS, in canine parietotemporal cortex in the majority of dogs tested. This finding is suggestive of a neural mechanism for quantity perception that has been conserved across mammalian evolution.

Usage Notes

Funding

John Merck Fund

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Award: T32 HD071845

Office of Naval Research, Award: N00014-16-1-2276