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Structural implications of traditional agricultural landscapes on the functional diversity of birds near the Korean Demilitarized Zone

Citation

Kim, Jae Hyun et al. (2021), Structural implications of traditional agricultural landscapes on the functional diversity of birds near the Korean Demilitarized Zone, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.02v6wwq1n

Abstract

Bird assemblages are sensitive to changes in landscape composition and the environment, such as those that result from drought. In this study, the relationship between landscape composition and avian functional diversity in traditional agricultural ecosystems in the Civilian Control Zone (CCZ) of Korea was examined. In addition, the resilience of biodiversity to changes in landscape elements resulting from drought conditions was investigated. The traditional agricultural landscape (TAL) of the sites studied was divided into three types: TAL 1 had a high proportion of rice paddies, TAL 2 included large forest areas, and TAL 3 represented areas with drylands. Of these, TAL 1 showed the highest species richness and functional richness, but these measures were most vulnerable to drought. Meanwhile, TAL 2 showed that the bird communities were more tolerant under drought event. This study shows that to conserve and enhance the diversity of birds in traditional agricultural landscapes of Northeast Asia, active management of forest areas is needed to protect bird populations. In addition, commercial pressures to develop this area will require urgent biodiversity conservation plans to protect the unique biodiversity of the Korean CCZ. This study thus provides landscape management guidance for conservation planning.Bird assemblages are sensitive to changes in landscape composition and the environment, such as those that result from drought. In this study, the relationship between landscape composition and avian functional diversity in traditional agricultural ecosystems in the Civilian Control Zone (CCZ) of Korea was examined. In addition, the resilience of biodiversity to changes in landscape elements resulting from drought conditions was investigated. The traditional agricultural landscape (TAL) of the sites studied was divided into three types: TAL 1 had a high proportion of rice paddies, TAL 2 included large forest areas, and TAL 3 represented areas with drylands. Of these, TAL 1 showed the highest species richness and functional richness, but these measures were most vulnerable to drought. Meanwhile, TAL 2 showed that the bird communities were more tolerant under drought event. This study shows that to conserve and enhance the diversity of birds in traditional agricultural landscapes of Northeast Asia, active management of forest areas is needed to protect bird populations. In addition, commercial pressures to develop this area will require urgent biodiversity conservation plans to protect the unique biodiversity of the Korean CCZ. This study thus provides landscape management guidance for conservation planning.

Funding

National Research Foundation of Korea, Award: NRF-2017R1A2B4006761