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Data from: Genetic and phenotypic changes in an Atlantic salmon population supplemented with non-local individuals: a longitudinal study over 21 years

Citation

Le Cam, Sabrina et al. (2014), Data from: Genetic and phenotypic changes in an Atlantic salmon population supplemented with non-local individuals: a longitudinal study over 21 years, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.044g3

Abstract

While introductions and supplementations using non-native and potentially domesticated individuals may have dramatic evolutionary effects on wild populations, few studies documented the evolution of genetic diversity and life-history traits in supplemented populations. Here, we investigated year-to-year changes from 1989 to 2009 in genetic admixture at 15 microsatellite loci and in phenotypic traits in an Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) population stocked during the first decade of this period with two genetically and phenotypically distinct source populations. We detected a pattern of temporally increasing introgressive hybridization between the stocked population and both source populations. The proportion of fish returning to the river after a single winter at sea (versus several ones) was higher in fish assigned to the main source population than in local individuals. Moreover, during the first decade of the study, both single-sea-winter and multi-sea-winter (MSW) fish assigned to the main source population were smaller than local fish. During the second decade of the study, MSW fish defined as hybrids were lighter and smaller than fish from parental populations, suggesting outbreeding depression. Overall, this study suggests that supplementation with non-local individuals may alter not only the genetic diversity of wild populations but also life-history traits of adaptive significance.

Usage Notes

Location

North West of France