Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Life in the cystic fibrosis upper respiratory tract influences competitive ability of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Citation

Bara, Jeffrey John; Matson, Zachary; Remold, Susanna K. (2018), Data from: Life in the cystic fibrosis upper respiratory tract influences competitive ability of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.0m801b4

Abstract

Understanding characteristic differences between host-associated and free-living opportunistic pathogens can provide insight into the fundamental requirements for success after dispersal to the host environment, and more generally into the ecological and evolutionary processes by which populations respond to simultaneous selection on complex interacting traits. We examined how cystic fibrosis (CF) associated and environmental isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa differ in the production of an ecologically important class of proteinaceous toxins known as bacteriocins, and how overall competitive ability depends on the production of and resistance to these bacteriocins. We determined bacteriocin gene content in a diverse collection of environmental and CF isolates and measured bacteriocin-mediated inhibition, resistance, and the outcome of competition in a shared environment between all possible pairs of these isolates at 25 °C and 37 °C. Although CF isolates encoded significantly more bacteriocin genes, our phenotypic assays suggest that they have diminished bacteriocin-mediated killing and resistance capabilities relative to environmental isolates, regardless of incubation temperature. Notably, however, although bacteriocin killing and resistance profiles significantly predicted head to head competitive outcomes, CF and environmental isolates did not differ significantly in their competitive ability. This suggests that the contribution of bacteriocins to competitive ability involves selection on other traits that may be pleiotropically linked to interference competition mediated by bacteriocins.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: NSF DEB-0950361

Location

United States