Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Sexually antagonistic genetic variance for fitness in an ancestral and a novel environment

Citation

Delcourt, Matthieu; Blows, Mark W.; Rundle, Howard D. (2012), Data from: Sexually antagonistic genetic variance for fitness in an ancestral and a novel environment, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.0pn48s2t

Abstract

The intersex genetic correlation for fitness (rwfm), a standardized measure of the degree to which male and female fitness covary genetically, has consequences for important evolutionary processes, but few estimates are available and none have explored how it changes with environment. Using a half-sibling breeding design, we estimated the genetic (co)variance matrix (G) for male and female fitness, and the resulting rwfm,in Drosophila serrata. Our estimates were performed in two environments: the laboratory yeast food to which the population was well adapted and a novel corn food. The major axis of genetic variation for fitness in the two environments, accounting for 51.3 per cent of the total genetic variation, was significant and revealed a strong signal of sexual antagonism, loading negatively in both environments on males but positively on females. Consequently, estimates of rwfm were negative in both environments (-0.34 and -0.73, respectively), indicating that the majority of genetic variance segregating in this population has contrasting effects on male and female fitness. The possible strengthening of the negative rwfm in this novel environment may be a consequence of no history of selection for amelioration of sexual conflict. Additional studies from a diverse range of novel environments will be needed to determine the generality of this finding.

Usage Notes