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Data from: Duplication and sub/neofunctionalization of Malvolio, an insect homolog of Nramp, in the subsocial beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides

Citation

Mehlferber, Elijah C. et al. (2018), Data from: Duplication and sub/neofunctionalization of Malvolio, an insect homolog of Nramp, in the subsocial beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.110qd

Abstract

With growing numbers of sequenced genomes, increasing numbers of duplicate genes are uncovered. Here we examine Malvolio, a gene in the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (Nramp) family, that has been duplicated in the subsocial beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, which exhibits advanced parental behavior. There is only one copy of Mvl in honey bees and Drosophila, whereas in vertebrates there are two copies that are subfunctionalized. We first compared amino acid sequences for Drosophila, beetles, mouse and humans. We found a high level of conservation between the different species, though there was greater variation in the C-terminal regions. A phylogenetic analysis across multiple insect orders suggests that Mvl has undergone several independent duplications. To examine the potential for different functions where it has been duplicated, we quantified expression levels of Mvl1 and Mvl2 in eight tissues in N. vespilloides. We found that while Mvl1 was expressed ubiquitously, albeit at varying levels, expression of Mvl2 was limited to brain and midgut. Because Mvl has been implicated in behavior, we examined expression during different behavioral states that reflected differences in opportunity for social interactions and expression of parental care behaviors. We found differing expression patterns for the two copies, with Mvl1 increasing in expression during resource preparation and feeding offspring, and Mvl2 decreasing in these same states. Given these patterns of expression, along with the protein analysis, we suggest that Mvl in N. vespilloides has experienced sub/neofunctionalization following its duplication, and may be evolving differing and tissue-specific roles in behavior and physiology.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: IOS-1354358

Location

Europe