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Data from: Mammal communities are larger and more diverse in moderately developed areas

Citation

Parsons, Arielle Waldstein et al. (2019), Data from: Mammal communities are larger and more diverse in moderately developed areas, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.11rf64v

Abstract

Developed areas are thought to have low species diversity, low animal abundance, few native predators, and thus low resilience and ecological function. Working with citizen scientist volunteers to survey mammals at 1427 sites across two development gradients (wild-rural-exurban-suburban-urban) and four plot types (large forests, small forest fragments, open areas and residential yards) in the eastern US, we show that developed areas actually had significantly higher or statistically similar mammalian occupancy, relative abundance, richness and diversity compared to wild areas. However, although some animals can thrive in suburbia, conservation of wild areas and preservation of green space within cities are needed to protect sensitive species and to give all species the chance to adapt and persist in the Anthropocene.

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