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Data from: Paternity analysis of wood turtles (Glyptemys insculpta) reveals complex mating patterns

Citation

Bouchard, Cindy; Tessier, Nathalie; Lapointe, François-Joseph (2017), Data from: Paternity analysis of wood turtles (Glyptemys insculpta) reveals complex mating patterns, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.121sk

Abstract

Mating system characteristics are of great importance as they may influence male and female reproductive success and reproductive isolation. The wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta) is a terrestrial freshwater species listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Considering its conservation status and the paucity of information currently available on parentage relationship for the species, we performed a microsatellite analysis to study the mating system of wood turtles in the Shawinigan River (Québec). We sampled 38 clutches over two years (14 in 2006 and 24 in 2007), for a total of 248 offspring genotyped with seven microsatellite loci. The reconstructed genotypes of the fathers revealed that reproductive success in the sampled clutches varied greatly between males and are positively correlated with the number of mates and clutches sired. Frequency of multiple paternity was estimated at 37% through a consensus of three different estimation methods. Positive correlation was observed between the genetic diversity of clutches and the number of fathers. Repeat paternity, however, was observed in 88% of the clutches by the same female in successive years, which suggests either a frequent use of sperm storage, or re-mating with the same partner in successive years.

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