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Data from: Discrepancies in vegetation phenology trends and shift patterns in different climatic zones in middle and eastern Eurasia between 1982 and 2015

Citation

Li, Yaobin; Zhang, Yuandong; Gu, Fengxue; Liu, Shirong (2019), Data from: Discrepancies in vegetation phenology trends and shift patterns in different climatic zones in middle and eastern Eurasia between 1982 and 2015, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1498h4m

Abstract

Changes in vegetation phenology directly reflect the response of vegetation growth to climate change. In this study, using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) dataset from 1982 to 2015, we extracted start date of vegetation growing season (SOS), end date of vegetation growing season (EOS) and length of vegetation growing season (LOS) in the middle and eastern Eurasia region and evaluated linear trends in SOS, EOS and LOS for the entire study area, as well as for four climatic zones. The results show that the LOS has significantly increased by 0.27 d/yr (days per year), mostly due to a significantly advanced SOS (-0.20 d/yr) and a slightly delayed EOS (0.07 d/yr) over the entire study area from 1982 to 2015. The vegetation phenology trends in the four climatic zones are not continuous throughout the 34 year period. Furthermore, discrepancies in the shifting patterns of vegetation phenology trend existed among different climatic zones. Turning points (TP) of SOS trends in the Cold zone, Temperate zone and Tibetan Plateau zone occurred in the mid or late 1990s. The advanced trends of SOS in the Cold zone, Temperate zone and Tibetan Plateau zone exhibited accelerated, stalled and reversed patterns after the corresponding TP, respectively. The TP did not occurred in Cold-Temperate zone, where the SOS showed a consistent and continuous advance. TPs of EOS trends in the Cold zone, Cold-Temperate zone, Temperate zone and Tibetan Plateau zone occurred in the late 1980s or mid-1990s. The EOS in the Cold zone, Cold-Temperate zone, Temperate zone and Tibetan Plateau zone showed weak advanced or delayed trends after the corresponding TP, which were comparable with the delayed trends before the corresponding TP. The shift patterns of LOS trends were primarily influenced by the shift patterns of SOS trends and were also heterogeneous within climatic zones.

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