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Data from: Stress modulation of cellular metabolic sensors: interaction of stress from temperature and rainfall on the intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma

Citation

Dong, Yunwei; Han, Guo-dong; Huang, Xiong-wei; Dong, Yun-wei (2014), Data from: Stress modulation of cellular metabolic sensors: interaction of stress from temperature and rainfall on the intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.14m55

Abstract

In the natural environment, organisms are exposed to large variations in physical conditions. Quantifying such physiological responses is, however, often done in laboratory acclimation studies, in which usually only a single factor is varied. In contrast, field acclimatization may expose organisms to concurrent changes in several environmental variables. The interactions of these factors may have strong effects on organismal function. In particular, rare events that occur stochastically and have relatively short duration may have strong effects. The present experiments studied levels of expression of several genes associated with cellular stress and metabolic regulation in a field population of limpet Cellana toreuma that encountered a wide range of temperatures plus periodic rain events. Physiological responses to these variable conditions were quantified by measuring levels of mRNA of genes encoding heat shock proteins (Hsps) and metabolic sensors (AMPKs and Sirtuin 1). Our results reveal high ratios of individuals in up-regulation group of stress-related gene expression at high temperature and rainy days, indicating the occurrence of stress from both prevailing high summer temperatures and occasional rainfall during periods of emersion. At high temperature, stress due to exposure to rainfall may be more challenging than heat stress alone. The highly variable physiological performances of limpets in their natural habitats indicate the possible differences in capability for physiological regulation among individuals. Our results emphasize the importance of studies of field acclimatization in unravelling the effects of environmental change on organisms, notably in the context of multiple changes in abiotic factors that are accompanying global change.

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