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Data from: Spatial variation in bird pollination and its mitigating effects on the genetic diversity of pollen pools accepted by Camellia japonica trees within a population at a landscape level

Citation

Nakanishi, Atsushi et al. (2019), Data from: Spatial variation in bird pollination and its mitigating effects on the genetic diversity of pollen pools accepted by Camellia japonica trees within a population at a landscape level, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.17q550q

Abstract

Bird pollination can vary spatially in response to spatial fluctuations in flowering even within plant populations. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that the spatial variation in bird pollination may induce mitigating effects which maintains or increases genetic diversity of pollen pools at local sites with low flowering densities. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the landscape-level genetic effects within a population of Camellia japonica on the pollen pools accepted by individuals in two reproductive years by using genotypes at eight microsatellite loci of 1323 seeds from 19 seed parents. Regression analyses using the quadratic models of correlated paternity between pollen pools against spatial distances between the seed-parent pairs revealed not only local pollination but also some amount of long-distance pollen dispersal. The genetic diversity of pollen pools accepted by seed parents tended to be negatively related to the densities of flowering individuals near the seed parents during winter (when the effective pollination of C. japonica is mediated mostly by Zosterops japonica). We show that the low density of flowering individuals may induce the expansion of the foraging areas of Z. japonica and consequently increase the genetic diversity of pollen pools. This spatial variation in bird pollination may induce the mitigating effects on the C. japonica population. The comparisons between the two study years indicate that the overall pattern of bird pollination and the genetic effects described here, including the mitigating effects, may be stable over time.

Usage Notes

Location

Tatera Forest Reserve
South Island of Tsushima
Japan
Nagasaki Prefecture
34° 9' N
129° 13' E