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Data from: Diversification rates have no effect on the convergent evolution of foraging strategies in the most speciose genus of bats, Myotis

Citation

Morales, Ariadna E; Ruedi, Manuel; Field, Kathryn; Carstens, Bryan C (2019), Data from: Diversification rates have no effect on the convergent evolution of foraging strategies in the most speciose genus of bats, Myotis, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.17vp4f3

Abstract

Adaptive radiations are defined as rapid diversification with phenotypic innovation led by colonization to new environments. Notably, adaptive radiations can occur in parallel when habitats with similar selective pressures are accessible promoting convergent adaptions. While convergent evolution appears to be a common process, it is unclear what are the main drivers leading the reappearance of morphologies or ecological roles. We explore this question in Myotis bats, the only Chiropteran genus with a worldwide distribution. Three foraging strategies ­–gleaning, trawling, and aerial netting– repeatedly evolved in several regions of the world, each linked to characteristic morphologies recognized as ecomorphs. Phylogenomic, morphometric, and comparative approaches were adopted to investigate convergence of such foraging strategies and skull morphology as well as factors that explain diversification rates. Genomic and morphometric data were analyzed from ~80% extant taxa. Results confirm that the ecomorphs evolved multiple times, with trawling evolving more often and foliage gleaning most recently. Skull morphology does not reflect common ancestry, evolves convergently with foraging strategy. While diversification rates have been roughly constant across the genus, speciation rates are area-dependent in taxa with temperate distributions. Results suggest that in this species-rich group of bats, first, stochastic processes have led divergence into multiple lineages. Then, natural selection in similar niches has promoted repeated adaptation of phenotypes and foraging strategies. Myotis bats are thus a remarkable case of ecomorphological convergence and an emerging model system for investigating the genomic basis of parallel adaptive radiation.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1701810

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1257784

Location

Worldwide