Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Genetic monitoring reveals temporal stability over 30 years in a small, lake resident brown trout population

Citation

Charlier, Johan; Laikre, Linda; Ryman, Nils (2012), Data from: Genetic monitoring reveals temporal stability over 30 years in a small, lake resident brown trout population, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.189f4

Abstract

Knowledge of the degree of temporal stability of population genetic structure and composition is important for understanding microevolutionary processes and for addressing issues on human impact on natural populations. We know little about how representative single samples in time are to reflect population genetic constitution. We explore the temporal genetic variability patterns over a 30-year period of annual sampling of a lake resident brown trout (Salmo trutta) population, covering 37 consecutive cohorts and five generations. Levels of variation remain largely stable over this period with no indication of substructuring within the lake. We detect genetic drift, however, and the genetically effective population size (Ne) was assessed from allele frequency shifts between consecutive cohorts using an unbiased estimator that accounts for the effect of overlapping generation. The overall mean Ne is estimated as 74. We find indications that Ne varies over time, but th ere is no obvious temporal trend. We also estimated Ne using a one-sample approach based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) not accounting for the effect of overlapping generations. Combining one-sample estimates for all years gives an Ne estimate of 76. This similarity between estimates may be coincidental or reflecting a general robustness of the LD approach to violations of the discrete generations assumption. In contrast to the observed genetic stability, body size and catch per effort have increased over the study period. Estimates of annual effective number of breeders (Nb) correlated with catch per effort suggesting that genetic monitoring can be used for detecting fluctuations in abundance.

Usage Notes