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Data from: Functional traits, flocking propensity and perceived predation risk in an Amazonian understory bird community

Citation

Martínez, Ari E.; Gomez, Juan P.; Ponciano, Jose Miguel; Robinson, Scott K. (2016), Data from: Functional traits, flocking propensity and perceived predation risk in an Amazonian understory bird community, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.18v4b

Abstract

Within a community, different species might share similar predation risks, and thus the ability of species to signal and interpret heterospecific threat information may determine species' associations. We combined observational, experimental and phylogenetic approaches to determine the extent to which evolutionary history and functional traits determined flocking propensity and perceived predation risk (response to heterospecific alarm calls) in a lowland Amazonian bird community. We predicted that small birds that feed myopically and out in the open would have higher flocking propensities and account for a higher proportion of positive responses to alarms. Using generalized linear models and the incorporation of phylogeny on data from 56 species, our results suggest that phylogenetic relationships alongside body size, foraging height, vegetation density and response to alarm calls influence flocking propensity. Conversely, phylogenetic relationships did not influence response to heterospecific alarm calls. Among functional traits, however, foraging strategy, foraging density and flocking propensity partially explained responses to alarm calls. Our results suggest that flocking propensity and perceived predation risk are positively related and that functional ecological traits and evolutionary history may explain certain species' associations.

Usage Notes

Location

Amazon Basin