Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Perceived shift of the centres of contracting and expanding optic flow fields: different biases in the lower-right and upper-right visual quadrants

Citation

Cheng, Xiaorong et al. (2019), Data from: Perceived shift of the centres of contracting and expanding optic flow fields: different biases in the lower-right and upper-right visual quadrants, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1c05010

Abstract

We studied differences in localizing the centres of flow in radially expanding and contracting patterns in different regions of the visual field. Our results suggest that the perceived centre of a peripherally viewed expanding pattern is shifted towards the fovea relative to that of a contracting pattern, but only in the lower right and upper right visual quadrants and when a single speed gradient with appropriate overall speeds of the trajectories of the moving dots was used. The biases were not systematically related to differences of sensitivity to optic flow in different quadrants. Further experiments demonstrated that the biases were likely due to a combination of two effects: an advantage of global processing in favor of the lower visual hemifield and a hemispheric asymmetry in attentional allocation in favor of motion-induced spatial displacement in the right visual hemifield. The bias in the lower right visual quadrant was speed gradient-sensitive and could be reduced to a non-significant level with the usage of multiple speed gradients, possibly due to a special role of the lower visual hemifield in extracting global information from the multiple speed gradients. A holistic processing on multiple speed gradients, rather than a predominant processing on a single speed gradient, was likely adopted. In contrast, the perceived bias in the upper right visual quadrant was overall speed-sensitive and could be reduced to a non-significant level with the reduction of the overall speeds of the trajectories. The implications of these results for understanding motion-induced spatial illusions are discussed.

Usage Notes