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Data from: Evidence for carry-over effects of predator exposure on pathogen transmission potential

Citation

Roux, Olivier et al. (2015), Data from: Evidence for carry-over effects of predator exposure on pathogen transmission potential, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1c817

Abstract

Accumulating evidence indicates that species interactions such as competition and predation can indirectly alter interactions with other community members, including parasites. For example, presence of predators can induce behavioral defenses in the prey, resulting in a change in susceptibility to parasites. Such predator-induced phenotypic changes may be especially pervasive in prey with discrete larval and adult stages for which exposure to predators during larval development can have strong carry-over effects on adult phenotypes. To our knowledge, no study to date has examined possible carry-over effects of predator exposure on pathogen transmission. We addressed this question using a natural food web consisting of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the mosquito vector Anopheles coluzzii, and a backswimmer, an aquatic predator of mosquito larvae. Although predator exposure did not significantly alter mosquito susceptibility to P. falciparum, it incurred strong fitness costs on other key mosquito life history traits including larval development, adult size, fecundity and longevity. Using an epidemiological model we show that larval predator exposure should overall significantly decrease malaria transmission. These results highlight the importance of taking into account the effect of environmental stressors on disease ecology and epidemiology.

Usage notes

Location

Burkina Faso