Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: "NGS based generation of expressed sequence tags for Lymantria dispar and Lymantria monacha, two closely related lepidopteran species with different responses to parasitism by Glyptapanteles liparidis" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 December 2013 to 31 January 2014

Citation

Arthofer, Wolfgang et al. (2014), Data from: "NGS based generation of expressed sequence tags for Lymantria dispar and Lymantria monacha, two closely related lepidopteran species with different responses to parasitism by Glyptapanteles liparidis" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 December 2013 to 31 January 2014, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1d2k9

Abstract

Introduction: The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, and the nun moth, Lymantria monacha, are closely related species (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae), co-seasonal and economically important forest pests on broadleaf and coniferous trees. In Central Europe, gypsy moth larvae are frequently parasitized by the gregarious, endoparasitic wasp Glyptapanteles liparidis (Hymenoptera, Braconidae). At oviposition, the female wasp injects between 10 and up to 100 eggs into the hemocoel of a single host larva, together with venom and calyx fluid containing polydnavirus (PDV) particles that subsequently play a critical role in suppressing the host immune response so that successful development of the parasitoid can proceed (Schopf 2007). These viruses, which are integrated in the genomic DNA of the wasp and undergo replication only in the female’s ovary, rapidly enter host hemocytes, fat body, and nervous system following parasitization, and viral genes are expressed. In L. dispar larvae parasitized by G. liparidis, the host’s hemocytes alter their behavior, fail to spread properly (thereby inhibiting the encapsulation response) and partly undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis), resulting in a dramatic drop in the host’s total hemocyte number (Schafellner and Schläger 2009).

Usage Notes