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Data from: Infection with Haemoproteus iwa affects vector movement in a hippoboscid fly – frigatebird system

Citation

Levin, Iris I.; Parker, Patricia G. (2013), Data from: Infection with Haemoproteus iwa affects vector movement in a hippoboscid fly – frigatebird system, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1d64r

Abstract

Haemosporidian parasites, which require both a vertebrate and invertebrate host, are most commonly studied in the life stages occurring in the vertebrate. However, aspects of the vector's behavior and biology can have profound effects on the parasite dynamics. Here we explore the effects of a haemosporidian parasite, Haemoproteusiwa, on a hippoboscid fly vector, Olfersiaspinifera. Olfersiaspinifera is an obligate ectoparasite of the great frigatebird, Fregata minor, living among bird feathers for all of its adult life. This study examines the movements of O. spiniferabetween great frigatebird hosts. Movement, or host-switching, was inferred by identifying host (frigatebird) microsatellite genotypesfrom fly bloodmeals that did not match the host from which the fly was collected. Such host-switches were analyzed using a logistic regression model, and the best-fit model included the H. iwa infection status of the fly and the bird host sex. Uninfected flies are more likely to have a bird genotype in their blood meal that was different from their current host's genotype (i.e., to have switched hosts) than infected flies. Flies collected from female birds were more likely to have switched hosts than those collected on males. Reduced movement of infected flies suggests that there may be a cost of parasitism for the fly. The effect of host sex is likely driven by differences in the sex ratio of bird hosts available to moving flies.

Usage Notes

Location

Ecuador
Galapagos Islands