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Data from: Similarity in temporal variation in sex-biased dispersal over short and long distances in the dark-eyed junco, Junco hyemalis

Citation

Liebgold, Eric B.; Gerlach, Nicole M.; Ketterson, Ellen D. (2017), Data from: Similarity in temporal variation in sex-biased dispersal over short and long distances in the dark-eyed junco, Junco hyemalis, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1jd40

Abstract

Patterns of sex-biased dispersal are typically consistent within taxa, e.g., female-biased in birds and male-biased in mammals, leading to theories about the evolutionary pressures that lead to sex-biased dispersal. However, generalizations about the evolution of sex biases tend to overlook that dispersal is mediated by ecological factors that vary over time. We examined potential temporal variation in between- and within-population dispersal over an 11-year period in a bird, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis). We measured between-population dispersal patterns using genetic assignment indices and found yearly variation in which sex was more likely to have immigrated. When we measured within-population spatial genetic structure and mark-recapture dispersal distances, we typically found yearly sex-biased dispersal patterns that mirrored between–population dispersal, indicating common eco-evolutionary causes despite expected differences due to the scale of dispersal. However, in years without detectable between-population sex biases, we found genetic similarity between nearby males within our population. This suggests that, in certain circumstances, ecological pressures may act on within-population dispersal without affecting dispersal between populations. Alternatively, current analytical tools may be better able to detect within-population sex-biased dispersal. Future work will investigate potential causes of the observed temporal variation in dispersal patterns and whether they have greater effects on within-population dispersal.

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