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Data from: Supplementary stocking selects for domesticated genotypes

Citation

Hagen, Ingerid J. et al. (2019), Data from: Supplementary stocking selects for domesticated genotypes, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1nh877d

Abstract

Stocking of hatchery produced fish is common practise to mitigate declines in natural populations and may have unwanted genetic consequences. Here we describe a novel phenomenon arising where broodstock used for stocking may be introgressed with farmed individuals. We test how stocking affects introgression in a wild population of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) by quantifying how the number of adult offspring recaptured in a stocked river depend on parental introgression. We found that hatchery conditions favour farmed genotypes such that introgressed broodstock produce up to four times the number of adult offspring compared to non-introgressed broodstock, leading to increased introgression in the recipient spawning population. Our results provide the first empirical evidence that stocking can unintentionally favour introgressed individuals and through selection for domesticated genotypes compromise the fitness of stocked wild populations.

Usage Notes

Location

Norway