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Data from: Divergence before the host shift? Prezygotic reproductive isolation among three varieties of a specialist fly on a single host plant

Citation

Hippee, Alaine C. et al. (2016), Data from: Divergence before the host shift? Prezygotic reproductive isolation among three varieties of a specialist fly on a single host plant, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1s6v2

Abstract

1. Although divergence via host-plant shifting is a common theme in the speciation of some phytophagous insects, it is not clear whether host shifts are typically initiators of speciation or if they instead contribute to divergence events already in progress. While host shifts appear to be generally associated with speciation events for flies in the genus Strauzia, three sympatric varieties of the sunflower fly [Strauzia longipennis (Wiedemann)] co-occur on the same host plant in the Midwestern United States and may have evolved reproductive barriers without a host shift. 2. The strength of two prezygotic reproductive barriers was compared among the three S. longipennis varieties: one barrier that is often associated with divergent ecological selection (allochronic isolation), and another that is more likely to be independent of ecological selection (pre-copulatory sexual isolation). The presence and relative strength of each barrier between fly varieties were evaluated using microsatellites, no choice mating experiments, studies of allochronic isolation, and field collection data. 3. Evidence for both allochronic isolation and pre-copulatory sexual isolation was detected between the three varieties of S. longipennis. The measure of isolation calculated for each barrier between the three varieties was lower than measures calculated between different species of Strauzia found on different hosts, suggesting that subsequent host shifts may increase the degree of reproductive isolation. For Strauzia and other specialist insects, some reproductive isolation may evolve prior to, and indeed may facilitate, host shifts.

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Location

Iowa
Illinois
Wisconsin