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Variation in eye abundance among scallops reveals ontogenetic and evolutionary convergence associated with life habits

Citation

Audino, Jorge; Adams, Dean; Serb, Jeanne (2022), Variation in eye abundance among scallops reveals ontogenetic and evolutionary convergence associated with life habits, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2547d7ws6

Abstract

Eyes are remarkable systems to investigate the complex interaction between ecological drivers and phenotypic outcomes. Some animals, such as scallops, have many eyes for visual perception, but to date, the evolution of multiple-eye systems remains obscure. For instance, it is unclear whether eye number changes over a lifetime or varies among species. Scallops are a suitable model group to investigate these questions considering the interspecific variation of adult size and ecological diversity. We tested whether eye abundance scales with body size among individuals and species and whether it varies with life habits. We performed comparative analyses, including a phylogenetic ANCOVA and evolutionary model comparisons, based on eye count and shell height (as a proxy of body size) across 31 scallop species. Our analyses reveal that patterns of increasing relationship with body size are not concordant among taxa and suggest ontogenetic convergence caused by similar ecologies. Accordingly, selective optima in eye numbers are associated with shifts in life habits. For instance, species with increased mobility have significantly more eyes than less mobile species. The convergent evolution of greater eye abundance in more mobile scallops likely indicates a visual improvement based on increased levels of oversampling of the surrounding environment.

Usage Notes

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Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1754331