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Data from: Sex-biased genetic component distribution among populations: additive genetic and maternal contributions to phenotypic differences among populations of Chinook salmon

Citation

Aykanat, Tutku; Bryden, Colleen A.; Heath, Daniel D. (2012), Data from: Sex-biased genetic component distribution among populations: additive genetic and maternal contributions to phenotypic differences among populations of Chinook salmon, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.26mv3f6d

Abstract

An approach frequently used to demonstrate a genetic basis to population-level phenotypic differences is to employ common garden rearing designs, where observed differences are assumed to be attributable to primarily additive genetic effects. Here, in two common garden experiments, we employed factorial breeding designs between wild and domestic, and among wild populations of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). We measured the contribution of additive (VA) and maternal (VM) effects to the observed population differences for 17 life history and fitness-related traits. Our results show that, in general, maternal effects contribute more to phenotypic differences among populations than additive genetic effects. These results suggest that maternal effects are important in population phenotypic differentiation, and also signify that the inclusion of the maternal source of variation is critical when employing models to test population differences in salmon, such as in local adaptation studies.

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