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Data from: Antibiotic susceptibility of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from patients with acne in a public hospital in Southwest China: prospective cross-sectional study

Citation

Zhu, Ting T; Zhu, Wen Y; Sun, Dong J (2019), Data from: Antibiotic susceptibility of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from patients with acne in a public hospital in Southwest China: prospective cross-sectional study, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.278cr0g

Abstract

Objective Antibiotics have been routinely used for several decades against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), but antibiotic resistance of P. acnes is becoming a global problem. Only one related Chinese study is available. The aim of this study was to assess the antibiotic susceptibility of P. acnes obtained from patients with acne in Southwest China.

Design This was a prospective cross-sectional study. Cutaneous samples were obtained from acne lesions on the face of 375 patients. Samples were cultured in anaerobic medium to identify the presence of P. acnes. Susceptibility tests of isolated P. acnes were performed for tetracycline, doxycycline, clindamycin, erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin using the Epsilometer test.

Results P. acnes was isolated from 227 patients; 224 isolates (98.7%) were susceptible to doxycycline and 220 (96.9%) were susceptible to tetracycline, followed by clindamycin and clarithromycin in 101 (44.5%) and 102 (44.93%) isolates, respectively. Susceptibility of P. acnes was detected for erythromycin in 96 (42.3%) patients, followed by azithromycin in 94 (41.4%). Subjects who received antibiotics (topical and oral) had higher frequencies of antibiotic-resistant P. acnes as well as increased antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentrations compared with patients without antibiotic treatment.

Conclusions P. acnes was highly sensitive to cyclines (doxycycline and tetracycline). P. acnes showed higher resistance rates to macrolides–lincosamides–streptogramins antibiotics (such as erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin and clindamycin). The irrational use of antibiotics for acne treatment is probably a problem in China and elsewhere. These results suggest that dermatologists should be more prudent in prescribing antibiotics for acne.

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