Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Do prey select for vacant hunting domains to minimize a multi-predator threat?

Citation

Kohl, Michel T. et al. (2019), Data from: Do prey select for vacant hunting domains to minimize a multi-predator threat?, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.28d5v76

Abstract

Many ecosystems contain sympatric predator species that hunt in different places and times. We tested whether this provides vacant hunting domains, places and times where and when predators are least active, that prey use to minimize threats from multiple predators simultaneously. We measured how northern Yellowstone elk (Cervus elaphus) responded to wolves (Canis lupus) and cougars (Puma concolor), and found that elk selected for areas outside the high‐risk domains of both predators consistent with the vacant domain hypothesis. This enabled elk to avoid one predator without necessarily increasing its exposure to the other. Our results demonstrate how the diel cycle can serve as a key axis of the predator hunting domain that prey exploit to manage predation risk from multiple sources. We argue that a multi‐predator, spatiotemporal framework is vital to understand the causes and consequences of prey spatial response to predation risk in environments with more than one predator.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB–1245373; DEB–0078130

Location

northern Yellowstone National Park