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Data for: Relationships between reproductive character displacement in genital morphology and the population-level cost of interspecific mating: Implications for the Templeton effect

Citation

Nishimura, Taira; Terada, Karen; Xia, Tian; Takami, Yasuoki (2022), Data for: Relationships between reproductive character displacement in genital morphology and the population-level cost of interspecific mating: Implications for the Templeton effect, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2bvq83btp

Abstract

Natural selection against maladaptive interspecific reproductive interactions may cause greater divergence in mating traits between sympatric populations than between allopatric populations in a pair of species, known as reproductive character displacement (RCD), evidence for the lock-and-key hypothesis of genital evolution. However, the relative importance of various processes contributing to RCD in genital morphology (e.g., reinforcement, reproductive interference, and population filtering or the Templeton effect) is not clear. Here, we examined hypotheses for RCD in genital morphology, with a special focus on the Templeton effect (which predicts that only highly differentiated populations can exist in sympatry). We examined population-level fitness costs in interspecific mating between Carabus maiyasanus and C. iwawakianus with RCD in genital morphology. A mating experiment using populations with various degrees of RCD in genital morphology showed no evidence for consistently lower interspecific mating costs in C. maiyasanus populations in contact with displacement in genital morphology than in remote populations, contrary to the predictions of the Templeton effect. Alternatively, interspecific mating costs varied among populations. Observed relationships between the sizes of genital parts concerning isolation and interspecific mating costs across populations suggested that population-level fitness costs do not necessarily decrease during the process leading to RCD. Our results provide insight into ecological and evolutionary processes during secondary contact in closely related species.

Funding

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 19770014

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 22770019

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 24570024

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 16H04844

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 21H02566