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Data from: Active sound production of scarab beetle larvae opens up new possibilities for species-specific pest monitoring in soils

Citation

Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Chesmore, David (2019), Data from: Active sound production of scarab beetle larvae opens up new possibilities for species-specific pest monitoring in soils, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2j87692

Abstract

Root-feeding Scarabaeidae larvae can pose a serious threat to agricultural and forest ecosystems, but many details of larval ecology are still unknown. We developed an acoustic data analysis method based on active sound production by larvae (i.e. stridulations) for gaining new insights into larval ecology. In a laboratory study, third instar larvae of the Common Cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha) (n = 38) and the Forest Cockchafer (M. hippocastani) (n = 15) kept in soil-filled containers were acoustically monitored for 5 min each, resulting in the first known stridulation recordings for each species. Subsequent continuous monitoring of three M. hippocastani larvae over several hours showed that a single larva could stridulate more than 70 times per hour, and stridulation rates increased drastically with increasing larval abundance. The new fractal dimension-based data analysis method automatically detected audio sections with stridulations and provided a semi-quantitative estimate of stridulation activity. It is the first data analysis method specifically targeting Scarabaeidae larvae stridulations in soils, enabling for the first time non-invasive species-specific pest monitoring.

Usage Notes

Location

Pfungstadt/Germany
Blaubeuren/Germany
Pfungstadt
Blaubeuren
Germany