Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Age-related mortality explains life history strategies of tropical and temperate songbirds

Citation

Martin, Thomas E. (2016), Data from: Age-related mortality explains life history strategies of tropical and temperate songbirds, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2m15n

Abstract

Life history theory attempts to explain why species differ in offspring number and quality, growth rate, and parental effort. I show that unappreciated interactions of these traits in response to age-related mortality risk challenge traditional perspectives and explain life history evolution in songbirds. Counter to a long-standing paradigm, tropical songbirds grow at similar overall rates to temperate species but grow wings relatively faster. These growth tactics are favored by predation risk, both in and after leaving the nest, and are facilitated by greater provisioning of individual offspring by parents. Increased provisioning of individual offspring depends on partitioning effort among fewer young because of constraints on effort from adult and nest mortality. These growth and provisioning responses to mortality risk finally explain the conundrum of small clutch sizes of tropical birds.

Usage Notes

Location

Venezuela
Malaysian Borneo
North America