Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Lack of sibling avoidance during mate selection in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana

Citation

Robertson, Deonna; Sullivan, Timothy; Westerman, Erica (2020), Lack of sibling avoidance during mate selection in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2ngf1vhjk

Abstract

Species susceptible to inbreeding depression are hypothesized to combat this problem through a number of different mechanisms, including kin recognition. For species with kin recognition, it is unknown if filial recognition is innate or due to prior juvenile experience with siblings. Here, we first test for the presence of kin recognition, and then test these two hypotheses for the development of filial recognition, in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, a species that suffers from inbreeding depression when forcibly inbred but recovers within a few generations when allowed to breed freely. We evaluate whether the rapid recovery from inbreeding depression is associated with either innate or learned filial recognition. First, we determined whether females innately prefer unrelated males over sibling males using females reared in isolation and then given a choice between an unrelated and a sibling male. Then, we determined if females raised with siblings learned to detect and avoid mating with siblings as adults when provided a choice between an unrelated male and a sibling male. Finally, we determined if females raised with siblings could learn to detect and avoid mating with familiar siblings when given a choice between familiar and unfamiliar siblings. We found that females mated randomly in all three choice combinations. Observed male behavior also did not influence female mating outcome. Our results suggest that adult females do not innately avoid or learn to avoid siblings during mate selection, and that filial detection may not be as critical to reproductive fitness in B. anynana as previously thought.

Methods

This is the behavioral data for the manuscript Lack of sibling avoidance during mate selection in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana. This data was used to show that females did not have innate or learned avoidance of siblings during mate selection. 

Funding

University of Arkansas

Arkansas Biosciences Institute