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Data from: Maternal lineages in native Canadian equine populations and their relationship to the Nordic and Mountain and Moorland pony breeds

Citation

Prystupa, Jaclyn Mercedes; Hind, Pamela; Cothran, Ernest Gus; Plante, Yves (2012), Data from: Maternal lineages in native Canadian equine populations and their relationship to the Nordic and Mountain and Moorland pony breeds, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2q3n104v

Abstract

A 378-bp section of the mitochondrial displacement loop was used to estimate genetic diversity in the native Canadian equine populations. The inclusion of 10 Mountain and Moorland, 3 Nordic pony breeds, 2 feral populations, and 5 horse breeds were also investigated as they may have influenced the development (or rejuvenation) of the native Canadian populations. A total of 281 samples were sequenced, which produced 75 haplotypes derived from 54 informative sites. On further investigation, 36 of these 75 haplotypes were found to be previously unreported. Overall, total diversity was lowest in the feral Sable Island population with a haplotype diversity (0.27 ± 0.12), nucleotide diversity (0.0007 ± 0.0004), and pairwise difference of 0.286 ± 0.317. This is not surprising due to the geographic isolation of this population. Haplotype diversity was highest (1.00 ± 0.13) in the New Forest population, pairwise difference was highest (8.061 ± 4.028) in the Icelandic breed, whereas nucleotide diversity was highest in the Exmoor breed (0.0209 ± 0.0025). Within the Canadian populations, haplotype diversity was highest in the Newfoundland pony (0.96 ± 0.08), whereas pairwise difference and nucleotide diversity was highest in the Canadian horse (7.090 ± 3.581 and 0.0188 ± 0.0042, respectively). Three different estimates of genetic distances were used to examine the phylogenetic relationships amongst these populations. All 3 estimates produced similar topologies. In general, the native Canadian populations were highly represented in the D clade, with particular emphasis in the D1 and D2 clades. This is an important factor when considering the phylogenetic conservation of these Canadian equine populations.

Usage Notes

Location

Canada