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Data from: Model-data assimilation of multiple phenological observations to constrain and predict leaf area index

Citation

Viskari, Toni; Hardiman, Brady; Desai, Ankur R.; Dietze, Michael C. (2015), Data from: Model-data assimilation of multiple phenological observations to constrain and predict leaf area index, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2s71b

Abstract

Our limited ability to accurately simulate leaf phenology is a leading source of uncertainty in models of ecosystem carbon cycling. We evaluate if continuously updating canopy state variables with observations is beneficial for predicting phenological events. We employed ensemble adjustment Kalman filter (EAKF) to update predictions of leaf area index (LAI) and leaf extension using tower-based photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) data for 2002–2005 at Willow Creek, Wisconsin, USA, a mature, even-aged, northern hardwood, deciduous forest. The ecosystem demography model version 2 (ED2) was used as the prediction model, forced by offline climate data. EAKF successfully incorporated information from both the observations and model predictions weighted by their respective uncertainties. The resulting estimate reproduced the observed leaf phenological cycle in the spring and the fall better than a parametric model prediction. These results indicate that during spring the observations contribute most in determining the correct bud-burst date, after which the model performs well, but accurately modeling fall leaf senesce requires continuous model updating from observations. While the predicted net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 precedes tower observations and unassimilated model predictions in the spring, overall the prediction follows observed NEE better than the model alone. Our results show state data assimilation successfully simulates the evolution of plant leaf phenology and improves model predictions of forest NEE.

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