Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Hurricane-mediated defoliation of kelp beds and pulsed delivery of kelp detritus to offshore sedimentary habitats

Citation

Filbee-Dexter, K.; Scheibling, R. E.; Scheibling, RE (2014), Data from: Hurricane-mediated defoliation of kelp beds and pulsed delivery of kelp detritus to offshore sedimentary habitats, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2s7mc

Abstract

Severe storm events are important agents of disturbance that can transport large quantities of algal detritus from highly productive kelp beds (or forests) in shallow water to deeper, more food-limited areas. We measured canopy cover in shallow kelp beds (5 to 15 m depth) and the cover of detrital kelp in sedimentary habitats directly offshore of these beds (20 to 45 m) before and after Hurricane Earl, which struck the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia in September 2010. The storm resulted in large losses of kelp canopy cover (from 71.0 to 38.7%, averaged across sites) and significantly increased the cover of detrital kelp deposits below the kelp beds (from 1.5 to 3.4%). Detrital deposits were more commonly found in a semi-protected bay than off an exposed headland and persisted in the bay for at least 6 wk. Sea urchins Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis were associated with detrital kelp deposits in offshore habitats. At sites with the greatest amount of detrital kelp, we estimated that sea urchins could consume this material within 2 mo, indicating that storm-generated detrital pulses may be an important form of trophic connectivity between adjacent ecosystems off this coast.

Usage Notes

Location

Nova Scotia
Halifax