Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Flexibility and control of thorax deformation during hawkmoth flight

Citation

Ando, Noriyasu; Kanzaki, Ryohei (2015), Data from: Flexibility and control of thorax deformation during hawkmoth flight, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.310nt

Abstract

The interaction between neuromuscular systems and body mechanics plays an important role in the production of coordinated movements in animals. Lepidopteran insects move their wings by distortion of the thorax structure via the indirect flight muscles (IFMs), which are activated by neural signals at every stroke. However, how the action of these muscles affects thorax deformation and wing kinematics is poorly understood. We measured the deformation of the dorsal thorax (mesonotum) of tethered flying hawkmoths, Agrius convolvuli, using a high-speed laser profilometer combined with simultaneous recordings of electromyograms and wing kinematics. We observed that locally amplified mesonotum deformation near the wing hinges ensures sufficient wing movement. Furthermore, phase asymmetry in IFM activity leads to phase asymmetry in mesonotum oscillations and wingbeats. Our results revealed the flexibility and controllability of the single structure of the mesonotum by neurogenic action of the IFMs.

Usage Notes