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Data from: Fungal community reveals less dispersal limitation and potentially more connected network than that of bacteria in bamboo forest soils

Citation

Xiao, Xian et al. (2017), Data from: Fungal community reveals less dispersal limitation and potentially more connected network than that of bacteria in bamboo forest soils, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.33th5

Abstract

A central aim of current microbial ecology research is to investigate the mechanisms shaping the assembly of soil microbial communities. Despite the importance of bacterial and fungal mediation of carbon cycling in forest ecosystems, knowledge concerning their distribution patterns and underlying mechanisms remains insufficient. Here, soils were sampled from six bamboo forests across the main planting area of Moso bamboo in southern China. The bacterial and fungal diversities were assessed by sequencing 16S rRNA and ITS gene amplicons, respectively, with an Illumina MiSeq. Based on structural equation modeling, dispersal limitation had strongest impact on bacterial beta diversity, while the mean annual precipitation had a smaller impact by directly or indirectly mediating the soil organic carbon density. However, only the mean annual temperature and precipitation played direct roles in fungal beta diversity. Moreover, the co-occurrence network analyses revealed a possibly much higher network connectivity in the fungal network than in the bacteria. With less dispersal limitation, stronger environmental selection, and a potentially more connected network, the fungal community had more important roles in the soil carbon metabolisms in bamboo forests. Fungal beta diversity and the clustering coefficient explained approximately 14.4% and 6.1% of the variation in the carbon metabolic profiles among sites, respectively, but that of bacteria only explained approximately 1.7% and 1.8%, respectively. This study explored soil microbial spatial patterns along with the underlying mechanisms of dispersal limitation, selection, and connectivity of ecological networks, thus providing novel insights into the study of the distinct functional traits of different microbial taxa.

Usage Notes

Location

Southern China