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Data from: Post-glacial recolonization of the North American Arctic by Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus): genetic evidence of multiple northern refugia and hybridization between glacial lineages

Citation

Moore, Jean-Sébastien; Bajno, Robert; Reist, James D.; Taylor, Eric B. (2016), Data from: Post-glacial recolonization of the North American Arctic by Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus): genetic evidence of multiple northern refugia and hybridization between glacial lineages, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.35bn3

Abstract

Aims: We investigated post-glacial recolonization of the North American Arctic by Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and examined potential hybridization between different glacial lineages upon secondary contact. Location: North American Arctic and adjacent areas. Methods: We collected mtDNA sequence data from 1355 individuals from 110 sampling locations and data from nine microsatellite loci from 931 individuals from 37 locations. We assessed the phylogenetic relationships and geographical distribution of mtDNA haplotypes and conducted historical demographic analyses. We used a Bayesian clustering analysis method to detect potential hybridization between glacial lineages. Results: Two highly divergent mtDNA lineages were identified in the Arctic region with distinct but overlapping geographic distributions: one in Beringia and the other over the entire Arctic Archipelago and coastal mainland east of Alaska. The microsatellite data also implied the existence of these two lineages. Evidence of hybridization was detected between the Arctic lineage and an Atlantic lineage in eastern North America. Main conclusions: Our data suggested survival and recolonization from two northern glacial refugia: one in Beringia and another in a smaller refugium, perhaps in the Arctic Archipelago itself or a separate refugium within Beringia. Patterns of hybridization detected supported the presence of a secondary contact zone between glacial lineages in the eastern Canadian Arctic.

Usage Notes

Location

North America