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Data from: Niche limits of symbiotic gut microbiota constrain the salinity tolerance of brine shrimp

Citation

Nougué, Odrade; Gallet, Romain; Chevin, Luis-Miguel; Lenormand, Thomas (2015), Data from: Niche limits of symbiotic gut microbiota constrain the salinity tolerance of brine shrimp, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.366nd

Abstract

Symbiosis generally causes an expansion of the niche of each partner along the axis for which a service is mutually provided. However, for other axes, the niche can be restricted to the intersection of each partner’s niche and can thus be constrained rather than expanded by mutualism. We explore this phenomenon using Artemia as a model system. This crustacean is able to survive at very high salinities but not at low salinities, although its hemolymph’s salinity is close to freshwater. We hypothesized that this low-salinity paradox results from poor performance of its associated microbiota at low salinity. We showed that, in sterile conditions, Artemia had low survival at all salinities when algae were the only source of carbon. In contrast, survival was high at all salinities when fed with yeast. We also demonstrated that bacteria isolated from Artemia’s gut reached higher densities at high salinities than at low salinities, including when grown on algae. Taken together, our results show that Artemia can survive at low salinities, but their gut microbiota, which are required for algae digestion, have reduced fitness. Widespread facultative symbiosis may thus be an important determinant of niche limits along axes not specific to the mutualistic interaction.

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