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Data from: Does reproductive isolation reflect the segregation of color forms in Spiranthes sinensis (Pers.) Ames complex (Orchidaceae) in the Chinese Himalayas?

Citation

Tao, Zhi-Bin et al. (2019), Data from: Does reproductive isolation reflect the segregation of color forms in Spiranthes sinensis (Pers.) Ames complex (Orchidaceae) in the Chinese Himalayas?, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3856701

Abstract

Isolation between species, or taxa sharing a common lineage, depends primarily on the relative strengths of various reproductive barriers. Previous studies on reproductive isolation between orchids emphasized mechanical and ethological barriers in flowers of species showing food and/or sexual mimicry. In this study, we investigated and quantified a series of pre- and post-pollination barriers between pink and white forms of Spiranthes sinensis sl, a nectar-secreting complex. We generated ML trees based on trnS-G and matK to explore phylogenetic relationships in this species complex. Spiranthes sinensis sl segregated from some other congeners but the white form constituted a distinct clade in relation to the pink form. The white form secreted 2-Phenylethanol as its single scent compound and was pollinated almost exclusively by native, large-bodied Apis cerana and Bombus species (Apidae). Apis cerana showed a high floral constancy to this form. The scentless, pink form was pollinated primarily by smaller bees in the genera Ceratina (Apidae), and members of the family Halictidae, with infrequent visits by A. cerana and Bombus species. Fruit set and the production of large embryos following inter-form pollination treatments were significantly lower compared to intra-form pollination results for the white form. Our results suggested that pollinator isolation, based on color and scent cues, may result in greater floral constancy in white populations when both forms are sympatric as two different, guilds of pollinators forage selectively preventing or reducing prospective gene flow. Post-pollination barriers appear weaker than pre-pollination barriers but they also play a role in inter-form isolation, especially in the white form. Our findings suggest that floral color forms in S. sinensis do not represent an unbalanced polymorphism. Interpretations of the evolutionary status of these forms are discussed.

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